Western Washington University Western Washington University

Organizational Behaviour:
People in Organizations

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Class Syllabus:

Instructors: Professor Craig Dunn
Office:
To Be Announced
Office Hours:
by appointment
E-mail: craig.dunn@wwu.edu
URL:
www.dunn.cc

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Explores the complex relationship between people and the organizations they lead / manage, beginning with coverage of the context of work and the nature of the corporate enterprise itself. Elements of the various psychological and sociological theories illuminating organizational behavior will be introduced and elaborated. Particular attention is given to an exploration of the human, social, and environmental consequences of business decision-making, and the characteristics of successful managers in this regard.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
As a result of successfully completing this course, students will develop an enhanced awareness of themselves – their tenacity, their values, their work motivations, their assumptions about human nature, their ethical predispositions, their tolerance for ambiguity, their temperment, and their assertiveness.

In addition managerial skills will be enhanced as students apply both stakeholder theory as well as ethical decision-making to a real-life business case of their choosing.

This is an intensive class, with active participation being critical to both learning as well as success of the course. Students should be prepared to speak up and be involved. They are encouraged to work with and discuss class activities with other students; however, final papers are to be recognizable as their own work. If these assumptions, objectives and tentative plans do not fit our situation, we will modify them as we work together. The faculty member reserves the right to adjust and/or amend the course outline as necessary to maximize student learning. If such changes are made, they will be posted on the course web page. Ask questions, raise issues, express concerns; the best discussions often evolve from trying to figure out how to skillfully handle difficult management situations.

"This is an exciting time to be a manager, full of challenges and opportunities. Today's organizations are increasingly complex, unpredictable, and fast-paced. Significant social and economic trends such as diversity, globalization, and technological advances have fundamentally changed the nature of managerial work. In such an environment, the ability to think broadly and deeply from a variety of perspectives is one of the most important skills a manager can have."

Paula J. Caprioni
The Practical Coach

EVALUATION POLICY:
A maximum of 100 points may be accumulated in this course. Point distribution will depend on grades for both a formal written case analysis and accompanying oral case presentation.

GRADING STANDARDS:
The following grading standards will be used to determine your final course grade. Students are responsible for monitoring their own progress throughout the term.

93.35 - 100 points

A

90 - 93.34 points

A-

86.65 - 89.99 points

B+

83.35 - 86.65 points

B

80 - 83.34 points

B-

76.65 - 79.99 points

C+

73.35 - 76.64 points

C

70 - 73.34 points

C-

PLAGIARISM:
Adoption of a section of the Western Washington University catalog entitled Grades and Intellectual Honesty will be used to resolve any plagiarism in the course; this section states:

Grades are given for the student’s work and achievement. Fair evaluation of students’ work and helpful instruction are possible only when students submit work which genuinely reflects their own reading, computation, research and thoughts and is their own production, whether in writing or other format(s). Intellectual dishonesty can result in a failing grade and the placement of a note in the student’s permanent record. For the university’s policy on academic dishonesty, see Appendix D.

These standards will be used for this intensive three-weekend course. Students involved in any form of academic dishonesty (including but not limited to plagiarism or `cheating') on any coursework will receive a failing grade for the course.

'. . .my spirit never walked beyond our counting house. . .[It] never roved beyond the narrow limits of our money-changing hole.'
'But you were always a good man of business, Jacob,' faltered Scrooge.
'Business!' cried the Ghost, wringing his hands again. 'Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business. . .'

-Jacob Marley
A Christmas Carol
(Charles Dickens)

READINGS:
Assigned case studies, reading materials, podcasts, and course videos will be available on the course schedule and/or distributed electronically or in class. Students are expected to read each assigned reading before the scheduled discussion of that reading, and to come prepared to respond to the disucssion questions posted for each class session.

WRITING ASSIGNMENTS (50% of course grade):
There will be six writing assignments throughout the term (see course schedule for due dates). You are to respond to three of these writing assignments: #1 or #2, #3 or #4, and #5 or #6. All assignments relate directly to the course content, either as presented in class and/or as covered in assigned readings. Each paper will take the form of a one-page, double-spaced, typed paper which directly addresses the question(s) posed. While it is certainly allowable for students to discuss these writing assignments with one another, final papers ought to be recognizable as the 'independent' work of the student submitting the writing assignment.

Papers are to be submitted electronically to craig.dunn@wwu.edu. The e-mail memo line as well as the MS Word file name MUST begin with the LAST NAME of the student and also include the course designation (MBA). Evaluation criteria for these assignments include:

o evidence of self-awareness
o adequacy of analysis
o coherence of argument
o practical/prescriptive merit
o overall professionalism

"Greed, for want of a better term, is good. Greed is right. Greed works. Greed clarifies, cuts through, and captures the essence of the evolutionary spirit. Greed in all of its forms-greed for life, for money, for love, knowledge-has marked the upward surge of mankind."

-Gordon Gecko
Oliver Stone's Wall Street

GROUP CASE ANALYSIS (50% of course grade):
Each student shall participate in a team-based case analysis , with the primary objective being to link organizational behaviour theory and practice. Each of the five teams is to prepare a formal class presentation as well as a written analysis of a business case. This analysis is to include: (1) a statement identifying the selected case issue; (2) listing of alternatives providing resolution of this case issue; (3) analysis of proposed resolutions from the perspective of organizational theory; (4) assessment of both the financial as well as the political viability of the recommended alternative; (5) selection of optimal resolution (with supporting defense); as well as (6) identificariton of significant barriers to implementation. Any assumptions made must be clearly identified as such, but do not 'assume away' the issues – resolve them!

A 'Case Proposal' form is to be submitted by each group no later than the end of the third day of the course. Cases can come from any appropriate current source; the Wall Street Journal and Business Week are among the more popular periodicals for sourcing timely business cases, but many other local sources are rich with topics related to organizational behaviour. Cases are to be presented during the class session set aside for case presentation (see course schedule for specific date), with the written analysis due three days later.

Reporting will take the form of a 30 minute oral presentation followed by a 30 minute question and answer session. Be creative. Students not in your group will be accountable for posing relevant questions to the presenting group.

Areas considered (in addition to those previously or subsequently mentioned) in grading the team project are listed in the table below.

o accuracy of issue identification
o clarity and conciseness of arguments
o use of theory to support recommendation(s)
o soundness of recommendation(s)
o feasibilty of recommendation(s)
o professionalism of case presentation
o creativity of approach
o ability to engage the class in discussion

MIDTERM AND FINAL EXAMINATIONS:
There are no examinations for this course.

COURSE SCHEDULE:
17 December

08:45 -- 12:00

* Learning Goals / Objectives

- MBA Learning Objectives Worksheet
- MBA Program Goals/Learning Objectives Tearsheet
- 12-item_Grit_Scale

* Overview of Syllabus / Expectations / Case Proposals

- http://faculty.wwu.edu/dunnc3/wwu.lanzhou.caseproposal-fall2016.htm

* Definition of Organizational Behaviour / Topics of Organizational Behaviour

- Dunn, C.P. Are Corporations Inherently Wicked?
- Are You Theory X or Theory Y?
17 December

13:00 -- 16:30

* Meaning of Work (Part I)

Download a PowerPoint handout for this and the following class session by clicking here

The Hungry Spirit: Beyond Capitalism..., Part B: Chapter 6

- Collins, Jim. What Comes Next?
- Bronson, P.O. What Should I Do With My Life?
- Peters, T. 'The Brand Called You'

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

17 December

17:00 -- 19:00

* Case Selection: Initial Group Discussion

18 December

08:45 -- 12:00

* Case Selection: Full Class Discussion


* Meaning of Work (Part II)

Download a PowerPoint handout for this and the previous class session by clicking here

The Hungry Spirit: Beyond Capitalism..., Part B: Chapter 6

- Taylor, Frederick. `The Principles of Scientific Management'
- DecisionWise. Employee Engagement Survey

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

A review of this topics may be accessed from the following web-based streaming video feed:

- MEANING OF WORK


WRITING OPTION #1: Which three attributes of meaningful work are of greatest importance to you, and why? Design an original mechanism designed to ensure your work 'captures' these attributes. Keep in mind the following: "Mechanisms force things to happen that reinforce your company's core purpose, converting that purpose into action. If I have a mechanism, I don't need the intention, because the mechanism will make things happen even when I'm not focused on them" (Jim Collins, What Comes Next).


* Management History

Group Presentations based on the following article and other research / perspectives

- Chapman, T.N. Comparative Management Philosophies
- History of Management Thought: The Evolution of Management Theory
- Pindur, W., Rogers, S. & Kim, P. The History of Management: A Global Perspective

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS


WRITING OPTION #2: Your review of the history of management thought has indicated that there have been shifts in our understanding of organizational behaviour over time. Your job is not to project where you see the field of organizational behaviour heading...in what way will emerging psychological and social developments impact our understanding of the role of individuals within organizations, and how these organizations are managed?

18 December

13:00 -- 16:30

* Class Case Analysis: Cherry Point Coal Terminal

- Coal Proposal Drives a Big Green Wedge into Bellingham Politics

Students may access a case worksheet for this class session by clicking here

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

19 December

CASE PROPOSALS DUE

- http://faculty.wwu.edu/dunnc3/wwu.lanzhou.caseproposal-fall2016.htm

23 December

WRITING ASSIGNMENT OPTION #1 OR OPTION #2 DUE

24 December

08:45 -- 12:00

*Corporate Governance

Download a PowerPoint handout for this class session by clicking here

- Colley, J.L. Jr., Doyle, J.L., Logan, G.W. & Stettinius, W. Corporate Governance (excerpt)
- Monks, R.A.G. & Minow, N. The Myth of the Director's Duty

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS


A review of these topics may be accessed from the following web-based streaming video feeds:

- CORPORATE GOVERNANCE


*Social Contract Theory

Download a PowerPoint handout for this and the following class session by clicking here

- Hardin, G. The Tragedy of the Commons
- Gold, R. & Ailworth, E. Oil Firms' Predicament: Who Should Cut Output?

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Download a PowerPoint handout for this class session by clicking here

24 December

13:00 -- 16:30

*Corporate Social Responsibility

- Friedman, M. 'The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits'
- Carroll, Archie B. 'The Pyramid of Corporate Social Responsibility'
- Arthur D. Little 'The Business Case for Corporate Social Responsibility'

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS


A review of these topics may be accessed from the following web-based streaming video feeds:

- OVERVIEW OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
- MILTON FRIEDMAN


*Stakeholder Theory

Download a PowerPoint handout for this and the previous class session by clicking here

- Clement, R.W. The Lessons from Stakeholder Theory for U.S. Business Leaders
- MindTools Stakeholder Analysis
- R. E. Freeman & McVea A Stakeholder Approach to Strategic Management
- Demand Metric (recommended resource tool for stakeholder mapping)

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS


A review of these topics may be accessed from the following web-based streaming video feeds:

- STAKEHOLDER THEORY


WRITING OPTION #3: Compare and contrast the views of the following four frameworks: 1) corporate governance, 2) social contract theory, 3) corporate social responsibility, and 4) stakeholder theory. Specifically focus on the question of which interests managers should represent within their leadership, according to the view of each of these theories.

24 December

17:00 -- 19:00

* Case Preparation

25 December

08:45 -- 12:00

*Ethical Decision-Making (Part I)

Download a PowerPoint handout for this class session by clicking here

Download an Ethical Decision-making worksheet for this class session by clicking here

- Kelman, Steven. `Cost-Benefit Analysis: An Ethical Critique'
- NASA System Failure Case Studies: Fire in the Sky
- Kauffman, C.W., Hurd, J.H. & Finley, S. Dissenting Opinion: FAA ARAC Fuel Tank Inerting Harmonization Working Group
- Kelliher, M. Plane Crash Victim Compensation under the Montreal Convention

Complete Guide to Ethics Management

SURVEY OF ETHICAL THEORETIC APTITUDES

MBA Ethics Survey:

Survey of Ethical Theoretic Aptitudes Score:

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS


A review of these topics may be accessed from the following web-based streaming video feeds:

- ETHICAL THEORY 1
- OMELAS_READING

25 December

13:00 -- 16:30

*Ethical Decision-Making (Part II)

Download a PowerPoint handout for this class session by clicking here

- Le Guin, Ursula. `The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas'
- Dunn, Craig P. `The Normative Defense for Affirmative Action'
- Dunn, Craig P. `Integrity Matters'

For a great 'read' on social justice and meaningful work: Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS


A review of these topics may be accessed from the following web-based streaming video feeds:

- ETHICAL THEORY 2
- ETHICAL DECISION MAKING


*Ensuring Ethical Behavior

Students may access a PowerPoint handout for this class session by clicking here

- Josephson Institute on Ethical Decision-Making
- Johnson & Johnson Credo
- Matthews, M. How Companies Can Avoid Federal Prosecution
- Chatterji, A. & Levine, D. Breaking Down the Wall of Codes

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS


WRITING OPTION #4: From the perspective of organizational behaviour, part of your job is to put in place mechanisms to insure employees act in an ethical manner. Outline a comprehensive program for accomplishing this goal. As you do this, make specific reference to ethical theory and organizational theory in support of each part of your comprehensive program.

30 December

WRITING ASSIGNMENT OPTION #3 OR OPTION #4 DUE

31 December

08:45 -- 12:00

*Sustainable Business Practices (Part I)

Students may access a PowerPoint handout for this and the following class session by clicking here

- Shanghai Daily. China to Levy Taxes to Fight Pollution
- Ellis, J. China Pollution
- Rohde, R.A. & Muller, R.A.. Air Pollution in China: Mapping of Cencentration and Sources
- Phillips, L. Energizing China Factories the Walmart Way

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

31 December

13:00 -- 16:30

*Sustainable Business Practices (Part II)

Students may access a PowerPoint handout for this and the previous class session by clicking here

- Phillips, L. Energizing China Factories the Walmart Way
- Enforcement of Environmental Law: Good Practices from...China

- Sagoff, M. Zuckerman's Dilemma: A Plea for Environmental Ethics
- Diamond, Jarod. 'Easter's End.' Discover, August 1995
- 3M's Pollution Prevention Pays Program
- Environmental Management Systems: The Basics

- Sustainability Accounting and Reporting - FAQ
- Sustainability Accounting and Reporting (Chapter 1)

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

31 December

17:00 -- 19:00

* Case Rehearsal

01 January

08:45 -- 12:00

* Biointegrity

* Case Presentation

- Guide to Case Analysis

The Myth of Gree

A Tale of Two Disneyland Resorts

Give Up Incentive Pay: Do You Agree?

* The Dark Triad

- Petriedes, K.V., Vernon, P.A., Schermere, J.A. & Veselka, L. Trait Emotional Intelligence and the Dark Triad Traits of Personality
01 January

13:00 -- 16:30

* Case Presentation

- Guide to Case Analysis

Prescription of GE & Baker Hughes: Combination Issues

Code of Ethics and Business Conduct within Organizations

* Team-building Lessons from Airline Disasters

- Gladwell, M. Outliers: The Story of Success (Chapter 7: The Ethnic Theory of Plane Crashes)
- Flottau, J. Aviaton Week
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WRITING #5: Identify a business problem or managerial challenge related to organizational behaviour that you face in your workplace, and then do the following:

1) Conduct a root cause analysis to uncover the most basic source of the problem or challenge;
2) Identify at least two perpectives or theories from this course that are relevant to the resolution of this problem or challenge;
3) Apply these theories, and craft a solution to the problem or challenge;
4) Draft a specific plan for implementation of your solution.

06 January

WRITING ASSIGNMENT #5 DUE


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